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Tick Species to Watch For

Top Three Tick Species 
Responsible for Tick-Borne Illnesses

Deer Tick

Adult Female Deer Tick
Adult Female

Lone Star Tick

Adult Female
Adult Female

American Dog Tick

Adult Female American Dog Tick
Adult Female

Rocky Mountain Wood Tick

Rocky Mountain Wood Female
Adult Female

Deer Tick

Larva
Larva

Active Times:

  • Larvae are active July - September
    • Do not carry disease at this stage
  • Nymphs are active May - August.

    • Very common at this stage to feed on humans, cats, and dogs 
  • Adults are active October - May.

    • If temperatures stay above freezing during the day, these ticks can be active year-round.
Nymph Deer Tick
Nymph

Where You Can Find Them:

Extensively Spread around the northeast states of the US states and in certain areas of upper midwestern states. VIEW CDC'S MAP HERE

  • Deciduous forest
  • Shrub branches
  • Leaf litter
  • Edges of wooded areas
Adult Male
Adult Male

Known Carrier of:

  • Lyme disease

  • Babesiosis

  • Anaplasmosis (a type of Ehrlichiosis)

Deer Tick
Adult Female

Notable Symptoms:

  • Lyme disease: Flu-like symptoms (fever, chills, muscle and joint aches) common in early stages of Lyme, red bullseye rash (erythema migrans or EM); arthritis, nervous system abnormalities, and heart rhythm irregularities possible in later stages of the disease. 

  • Babesiosis: Spiking fever, chills, exhaustion, respiratory distress 

  • Anaplasmosis: Fever, headache, chills  

Lone Star Tick

Larva
Larva

Active Times:

  • Larvae are active July - late September.
    • Do not carry disease, they still bite humans at this stage.
  • Nymphs are active May - early August.
    • Can possibly  carry disease at this stage
  • Adults are active April - late August.
    • Recent reports have found that a bit from this tick can actually cause a meat allergy in some people. LEARN MORE HERE
Nymph
Nymph

Where You Can Find Them:

Commonly found spread throughout the east and south-east states of the US. VIEW CDC'S MAP HERE

  • Woodlands
  • Areas of dense undergrowth
  • Around known animal resting areas
Lone Star Tick
Adult Male

Known Carrier of:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

  • 'Stari' borreliosis

  • Monocytic Ehrlichiosis. 

Adult Female
Adult Female

Notable Symptoms:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Fever, headache, rash, vomiting, diarrhea. (Source: CDC)

  • 'Stari' borreliosis: Rash, fatigue, muscle pains, fever, headache. (Source: CDC)

  • Monocytic Ehrlichiosis: Chills, fever, headache, sweating, nausea, muscle aches, vomiting.

American Dog Tick

Larva
Larva

Active Times:

  • Larvae are active April - September.
    • Do not transmit diseases or attach to humans. 
  • Nymphs are active May - July.
    • Rarely ever attach to humans, but can transmit diseases
  • Adults are active April - early August.
    • Commonly attack humans along with medium-sized wildlife hosts.
Nymph
Nymph

Where You Can Find Them:

Found in all states east of the Rocky Mountains and in a few specific areas along the Pacific coast. VIEW CDC'S MAP HERE

  • Walking trails
  • Grassy fields
  • Scrubland
  • Other areas with little to no tree coverage
Adult Male
Adult Male

Known Carrier of:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever

  • Tularemia

Adult Female American Dog Tick
Adult Female

Notable Symptoms:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever:
    Fever, headache, rash, vomiting, diarrhea. (Source: CDC)

  • Tularemia: High fever, skin ulcer, lymph gland swelling. (Source: CDC)

Rocky Mountain Wood Tick

Rocky Mountain Wood Larva
Larva

Active Times:

  • Larvae are active March - October.
    • Do not transmit disease at this stage
  • Nymphs are active March - October.
    • Rarely attach to humans but can transmit harmful pathogens
  • Adults are active January - November.
    • The most common stage for the Rocky Mountain Wood Ticks to attach and feed
Rocky Mountain Wood Nymph
Nymph

Where You Can Find Them:

Limited to the states around the Rocky Mountains and Southwestern Canda in elevations above 4,000ft. VIEW THE CDC'S MAP HERE

  • Shrublands
  • Lightly wooded areas
  • Open grasslands
  • Along walking trails, primarily at lower elevations
Rocky Mountain Wood Adult Male
Adult Male

Known Carrier of:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever
  • Colorado Tick Fever Virus (CTFV)
  • Rickettsia
Rocky Mountain Wood Female
Adult Female

Notable Symptoms:

  • Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever: Fever, headache, rash, vomiting, diarrhea. (Source: CDC)

  • 'Stari' borreliosis: Rash, fatigue, muscle pains, fever, headache. (Source: CDC)

  • Monocytic Ehrlichiosis: Chills, fever, headache, sweating, nausea, muscle aches, vomiting.